Now Playing Tracks

themarvjthompson:

Black Superheroes in Comic Book Movies.

I wanted to make this to show my appreciation to black superheroes. As you can see, it’s not a lot of them in Hollywood films. But, unlike DC, I can respect Marvel for featuring several black superheroes in their comic book movies. And we are still waiting on Black Panther, Green Lantern (John Stewart), Static and many more. 

 (click the images to view the character names) 

How media clearly reflects the sexism and the racism we cannot see in ourselves.

bana05:

I wanted my first-year film students to understand what happens to a story when actual human beings inhabit your characters, and the way they can inspire storytelling. And I wanted to teach them how to look at headshots and what you might be able to tell from a headshot. So for the past few years I’ve done a small experiment with them.

It works like this: I bring in my giant file of head shots, which include actors of all races, sizes, shapes, ages, and experience levels. Each student picks a head shot from the stack and gets a few minutes to sit with the person’s face and then make up a little story about them. 

Namely, for white men, they have no trouble coming up with an entire history, job, role, genre, time, place, and costume. They will often identify him without prompting as “the main character.” The only exception? “He would play the gay guy.” For white women, they mostly do not come up with a job (even though it was specifically asked for), and they will identify her by her relationships. “She would play the mom/wife/love interest/best friend.” I’ve heard “She would play the slut” or “She would play the hot girl.” A lot more than once.

For nonwhite men, it can be equally depressing. “He’s in a buddy cop movie, but he’s not the main guy, he’s the partner.” “He’d play a terrorist.” “He’d play a drug dealer.” “A thug.” “A hustler.” “Homeless guy.” One Asian actor was promoted to “villain.”

For nonwhite women (grab onto something sturdy, like a big glass of strong liquor), sometimes they are “lucky” enough to be classified as the girlfriend/love interest/mom, but I have also heard things like “Well, she’d be in a romantic comedy, but as the friend, you know?” “Maid.” “Prostitute.” “Drug addict.”

I should point out that the responses are similar whether the group is all or mostly-white or extremely racially mixed, and all the groups I’ve tried this with have been about equally balanced between men and women, though individual responses vary. Women do a little better with women, and people of color do a little better with people of color, but female students sometimes forget to come up with a job for female actors and black male students sometimes tell the class that their black male actor wouldn’t be the main guy.

Once the students have made their pitches, we interrogate their opinions. “You seem really sure that he’s not the main character – why? What made you automatically say that?” “You said she was a mom. Was she born a mom, or did she maybe do something else with her life before her magic womb opened up and gave her an identity? Who is she as a person?” In the case of the “thug“, it turns out that the student was just reading off his film resume. This brilliant African American actor who regularly brings houses down doing Shakespeare on the stage and more than once made me weep at the beauty and subtlety of his performances, had a list of film credits that just said “Thug #4.” “Gang member.” “Muscle.” Because that’s the film work he can get. Because it puts food on his table.

So, the first time I did this exercise, I didn’t know that it would turn into a lesson on racism, sexism, and every other kind of -ism. I thought it was just about casting. But now I know that casting is never just about casting, and this day is a real teachable opportunity. Because if we do this right, we get to the really awkward silence, where the (now mortified) students try to sink into their chairs. Because, hey, most of them are proud Obama voters! They have been raised by feminist moms! They don’t want to be or see themselves as being racist or sexist. But their own racism and sexism is running amok in the room, and it’s awkward.

This for every time someone criticizes how characters of color and female characters of color especially are treated in text and by subsequent fandoms.  It’s never “just a television/movie/book”. It’s never been ”just”.

(Source: letthetruthlaugh)

jsuchafckinlady:

chocolatefitspo:

dynastylnoire:

babefield:

choice36c:

"MODERN DAY LYNCHINGS"

Kody (Pretty Boy) Ingham (pictured above) was found hanging from a tree in front of his white girlfriends house on July 15, 2013 (the same night as the George Zimmerman verdict) in Athens, Texas. it was chalked up as a suicide and no investigation ensued, even though two hours prior he called his mother to pick him up from the site he died at. no newspaper article, just a four sentence obituary in the local papers and his family has been trying hard to make any mainstream news channel blow up the story to find the killers.

Roy Veal was found hanging in Woodville, Mississippi in 2004. he originally lived in Seattle and went to his mother’s home in Woodville to help her fight for the rights to their family land against a white man. Oil had been found underneath the land.

Roy’s head was covered with a pillow case and burned papers of the documented proof he had to prove his mothers’ ownership were found burned at his feet. He was later found hanging from a tree. His death was ruled a suicide.

His family is still trying to get attention for the case 

Reynard Johnson, 17, was found hanging from a tree on his front lawn on June 16, 2000 in Kokomo, Mississippi. His death was ruled a suicide even though the belt around his neck was not his. Authorities said since no hate group left a message by the body, there was nothing to investigate. Family members said the motive was his relationship with a white girl, he was constantly being harassed because of this.

……….

booooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooost

This stuff still happens guys. Boosting

I told y’all they hang niggas down there smh sad

For My Sistah(s): A Black Feminist Queer Consciousness-Raising Book List

(Source: daughterofzami)

I maintain that every civil rights bill in this country was passed for white people, not for black people. For example, I am black. I know that. I also know that while I am black I am a human being. Therefore I have the right to go into any public place. White people don’t know that. Every time I tried to go into a public place they stopped me. So some boys had to write a bill to tell that white man, “He’s a human being; don’t stop him." That bill was for the white man, not for me. I knew I could vote all the time and that it wasn’t a privilege but my right. Every time I tried I was shot, killed or jailed, beaten or economically deprived. So somebody had to write a bill to tell white people, “When a black man comes to vote, don’t bother him." That bill was for white people. I know I can live anyplace I want to live. It is white people across this country who are incapable of allowing me to live where I want. You need a civil rights bill, not me.

Stokely Carmichael, setting shit straight and placing responsibility for the “race problem” squarely where it belongs. 

 

The very language in regards to civil rights in this country is embedded in white supremacist ideology. How many of us have been duped into accepting the fallacious notion that whites have “given” blacks rights? The notion itself presupposes black inferiority while failing to acknowledge the root problem: white racism. Change the language, change your mind.

(via chancellorschamber)

OMG

(via weakdaes)

Pair with “Racism is the white people’s disease”. Ya’ll brought on the problems.

(via kenobi-wan-obi)

onitaset:

It’s a sad commentary when a Brother makes a song called “The Man” and he himself is the only person to represent the song to either Malcolm or  King (and he does both no less!)

Too many of our people saying Lebron James and Michael Jordan are “the Man.”  Kind of.  But real men were Malcolm X and Martin Luther King Jr.  I’m saluting Aloe Blacc for representing.  And much appreciation to HarlemLoves for confirming in fact he was representing Malcolm X at 3:16.

http://www.harlemloves.com/aloe-blacc/

To Tumblr, Love Pixel Union